PLD1962

A simple man with a curious mind. Alive in a rural place , looking to connect world-wide.
girl-havoced:

I believe in free education, one that’s available to everyone; no matter their race, gender, age, wealth, etc… This masterpost was created for every knowledge hungry individual out there. I hope it will serve you well. Enjoy!
FREE ONLINE COURSES (here are listed websites that provide huge variety of courses)
Alison 
Coursera
FutureLearn
open2study
Khan Academy
edX
P2P U
Academic Earth
iversity
Stanford Online
MIT Open Courseware
Open Yale Courses
BBC Learning
OpenLearn
Carnegie Mellon University OLI
University of Reddit
Saylor
IDEAS, INSPIRATION & NEWS (websites which deliver educational content meant to entertain you and stimulate your brain)
TED
FORA
Big Think  
99u
BBC Future
Seriously Amazing
How Stuff Works
Discovery News
National Geographic
Science News
Popular Science
IFLScience
YouTube Edu
DIY & HOW-TO’S (Don’t know how to do that? Want to learn how to do it yourself? Here are some great websites.)
wikiHow
Wonder How To
instructables
eHow
Howcast
MAKE
Do it yourself
FREE TEXTBOOKS & E-BOOKS
OpenStax CNX
Open Textbooks
Bookboon
Textbook Revolution
E-books Directory
FullBooks
Books Should Be Free
Classic Reader
Read Print
Project Gutenberg
AudioBooks For Free
LibriVox
Poem Hunter
Bartleby
MIT Classics
Many Books
Open Textbooks BCcampus
Open Textbook Library
WikiBooks
SCIENTIFIC ARTICLES & JOURNALS
Directory of Open Access Journals
Scitable
PLOS
Wiley Open Access
Springer Open
Oxford Open
Elsevier Open Access
ArXiv
Open Access Library
LEARN:
1. LANGUAGES
Duolingo
BBC Languages
Learn A Language
101languages
Memrise
Livemocha
Foreign Services Institute
My Languages
Surface Languages
Lingualia
OmniGlot
OpenCulture’s Language links
2. COMPUTER SCIENCE & PROGRAMMING
Codecademy
Programmr
GA Dash
CodeHS
w3schools
Code Avengers
Codelearn
The Code Player
Code School
Code.org
Programming Motherf*?$%#
Bento
Bucky’s room
WiBit
Learn Code the Hard Way
Mozilla Developer Network
Microsoft Virtual Academy
3. YOGA & MEDITATION
Learning Yoga
Learn Meditation
Yome
Free Meditation
Online Meditation
Do Yoga With Me
Yoga Learning Center
4. PHOTOGRAPHY & FILMMAKING
Exposure Guide
The Bastards Book of Photography
Cambridge in Color
Best Photo Lessons
Photography Course
Production Now
nyvs
Learn About Film
Film School Online
5. DRAWING & PAINTING
Enliighten
Ctrl+Paint
ArtGraphica
Google Cultural Institute
Drawspace
DragoArt
WetCanvas
6. INSTRUMENTS & MUSIC THEORY
Music Theory
Teoria
Music Theory Videos
Furmanczyk Academy of Music
Dave Conservatoire
Petrucci Music Library
Justin Guitar
Guitar Lessons
Piano Lessons
Zebra Keys
Play Bass Now
7. OTHER UNCATEGORIZED SKILLS
Investopedia
The Chess Website
Chesscademy
Chess.com
Spreeder
ReadSpeeder
First Aid for Free
First Aid Web
Wolfram Demonstrations Project
Please feel free to add more learning focused websites. 
*There are a lot more learning websites out there, but I picked the ones that are, as far as I’m aware, completely free and in my opinion the best/ more useful.

girl-havoced:

I believe in free education, one that’s available to everyone; no matter their race, gender, age, wealth, etc… This masterpost was created for every knowledge hungry individual out there. I hope it will serve you well. Enjoy!

FREE ONLINE COURSES (here are listed websites that provide huge variety of courses)

IDEAS, INSPIRATION & NEWS (websites which deliver educational content meant to entertain you and stimulate your brain)

DIY & HOW-TO’S (Don’t know how to do that? Want to learn how to do it yourself? Here are some great websites.)

FREE TEXTBOOKS & E-BOOKS

SCIENTIFIC ARTICLES & JOURNALS

LEARN:

1. LANGUAGES

2. COMPUTER SCIENCE & PROGRAMMING

3. YOGA & MEDITATION

4. PHOTOGRAPHY & FILMMAKING

5. DRAWING & PAINTING

6. INSTRUMENTS & MUSIC THEORY

7. OTHER UNCATEGORIZED SKILLS

Please feel free to add more learning focused websites. 

*There are a lot more learning websites out there, but I picked the ones that are, as far as I’m aware, completely free and in my opinion the best/ more useful.

(via neptuneslittlehelper)

jtwhite5:


Dawn & Fritz Ludwig have been growing & making the BEST #apples, #cider & #cider doughnuts for 33 years at #PropagationPieceOrchard in #Shaftsbury, #Vermont. They’re open -woohoo!!!!! (at Propagation Piece Orchard)

jtwhite5:

Dawn & Fritz Ludwig have been growing & making the BEST #apples, #cider & #cider doughnuts for 33 years at #PropagationPieceOrchard in #Shaftsbury, #Vermont. They’re open -woohoo!!!!! (at Propagation Piece Orchard)

(via son-pereda)

Watch her face when she listens to her favorite song, or when she reads her favorite part of her favorite book, or when she’s watching her favorite movie. You see how happy she is? Try your best to keep her that happy.

Unknown (via perfect)

via perfect

(via worshipgifs)

(Source: putins-babymama, via worshipgifs)

The Rise of Urban Agriculture: It's Growing on Us

almostarcadian:

Urban Agriculture may be a new term, but the concept itself dates back to ancient civilizations. The Sumerians developed a system of irrigation using canals that connected surrounding bodies of water to their cities where they farmed. The Incans utilized a terrace system to grow crops in their…

agritecture:

Vertical Farming: Towering Vision, Uncertain Future

Farmers are making inroads supplying local food to hungry city foodies, but many producers are trying to grow more food in urban centers. City real estate is at a premium, so some producers are finding more space by using what’s called “vertical farming,” and going up rather than spreading out.
Growers across the country are heading indoors, using greenhouses and hydroponics – growing plants in a water and nutrient solution instead of soil and using lamps to replace sunlight. Vertical farming takes that to a new level.
But what exactly is a “vertical farm”? Do an internet search and you’ll get some very different pictures of what that term means. 
Some conceptualized vertical farms are like space-age skyscrapers, while others are simple, boxy structures with racks of artificially lit plants stacked to the ceiling.
The man widely credited with bring the term into the mainstream says it’s simple: any high-tech greenhouse that goes up rather than out.
 “Instead of spreading out,” said Columbia University ecologist and professor emeritus Dr. Dickson Despommier, “take those greenhouses and stack them on top of each other, employing the same technologies – you’ve got yourself a vertical farm.”
Despommier is among the futurists who argue that the booming global urban population will make self-sustaining urban food systems a necessity.
“I can see the urban landscape parasitizing the rural landscape for its resources,” Despommier said, adding that he sees densely populated areas in Europe, Korea and Japan benefiting most from his vertical vision.  
But critics of that vision say vertical farming won’t be able to produce the scale of food a growing population will need – at least not without massive amounts of energy and other inputs.
“Vertical farming is kind of a vision of factory farming of plants,” said Stan Cox of The Land Institute in Kansas, a group that advocates for environmental and sustainable agriculture issues. “Just like with animals, it requires much higher inputs of energy, much more stress on the plant, and generally is doing things the hard way.”
In Chicago, entrepreneur John Edel is working hard to show skeptics that garbage itself can fuel vertical farming, making it more sustainable. With a grant from the State of Illinois, he’s installing a giant anaerobic digester that will convert truckloads of food waste into biogas, burned onsite to keep the lights on.
“We’re in the thick of construction now,” Edel said. “I think by the end of this year everything will be operational and we’ll be well beyond net-zero.”
Edel’s vertical farm, The Plant Chicago, looks different than the architectural renderings of towering green skyscrapers you’ll find on the web.
In 2010, Edel bought a four-story, 94,000 square foot warehouse in a bankruptcy sale. The hulking red brick facility, built in the 1920s next to Chicago’s Union Stockyards, used to process bacon and ham. Now it is home to 11 small-scale food businesses, from bakers to kombucha brewers to aquaponic farms growing greens and fish for area restaurants.
The mission?
“To create those jobs and to grow the food as locally as possible,” Edel said. “In order to reduce the pollution associated with its transport, the costs associated with its transport, and to keep those dollars here, close to home.” 
Edel’s operation, which he calls a “social enterprise”, is trying to create a replicable model of closed-loop, energy-independent urban food production. He’s less concerned about competing for space in a grocery store produce aisle than he is about raising awareness. 
But FarmedHere, a commercial vertical farm in Chicago, sells basil and other greens to upscale grocery chains throughout the city and suburbs. And Green Spirit Farms recently inked a deal to expand its vertical farming operation to an empty factory near Scranton, Pa.  At 300,000 square feet, it would become the largest in the nation. 
The move to grow more food indoors has also caught on for pharmaceuticals. The Defense Department funded a vertical farm in Texas that grows plants for vaccines and cancer-fighting drugs.
Still, most vertical farming operations today, even with increased efficiency due to LED lighting, have a hefty electric bill and carbon footprint.
Farms aren’t all white picket fences and red barns anymore. And in the future, they might be in skyscrapers.
SOURCE

agritecture:

Vertical Farming: Towering Vision, Uncertain Future

Farmers are making inroads supplying local food to hungry city foodies, but many producers are trying to grow more food in urban centers. City real estate is at a premium, so some producers are finding more space by using what’s called “vertical farming,” and going up rather than spreading out.

Growers across the country are heading indoors, using greenhouses and hydroponics – growing plants in a water and nutrient solution instead of soil and using lamps to replace sunlight. Vertical farming takes that to a new level.

But what exactly is a “vertical farm”? Do an internet search and you’ll get some very different pictures of what that term means. 

Some conceptualized vertical farms are like space-age skyscrapers, while others are simple, boxy structures with racks of artificially lit plants stacked to the ceiling.

The man widely credited with bring the term into the mainstream says it’s simple: any high-tech greenhouse that goes up rather than out.

 “Instead of spreading out,” said Columbia University ecologist and professor emeritus Dr. Dickson Despommier, “take those greenhouses and stack them on top of each other, employing the same technologies – you’ve got yourself a vertical farm.”

Despommier is among the futurists who argue that the booming global urban population will make self-sustaining urban food systems a necessity.

“I can see the urban landscape parasitizing the rural landscape for its resources,” Despommier said, adding that he sees densely populated areas in EuropeKorea and Japan benefiting most from his vertical vision.  

But critics of that vision say vertical farming won’t be able to produce the scale of food a growing population will need – at least not without massive amounts of energy and other inputs.

“Vertical farming is kind of a vision of factory farming of plants,” said Stan Cox of The Land Institute in Kansas, a group that advocates for environmental and sustainable agriculture issues. “Just like with animals, it requires much higher inputs of energy, much more stress on the plant, and generally is doing things the hard way.”

In Chicago, entrepreneur John Edel is working hard to show skeptics that garbage itself can fuel vertical farming, making it more sustainable. With a grant from the State of Illinois, he’s installing a giant anaerobic digester that will convert truckloads of food waste into biogas, burned onsite to keep the lights on.

“We’re in the thick of construction now,” Edel said. “I think by the end of this year everything will be operational and we’ll be well beyond net-zero.”

Edel’s vertical farm, The Plant Chicago, looks different than the architectural renderings of towering green skyscrapers you’ll find on the web.

In 2010, Edel bought a four-story, 94,000 square foot warehouse in a bankruptcy sale. The hulking red brick facility, built in the 1920s next to Chicago’s Union Stockyards, used to process bacon and ham. Now it is home to 11 small-scale food businesses, from bakers to kombucha brewers to aquaponic farms growing greens and fish for area restaurants.

The mission?

“To create those jobs and to grow the food as locally as possible,” Edel said. “In order to reduce the pollution associated with its transport, the costs associated with its transport, and to keep those dollars here, close to home.” 

Edel’s operation, which he calls a “social enterprise”, is trying to create a replicable model of closed-loop, energy-independent urban food production. He’s less concerned about competing for space in a grocery store produce aisle than he is about raising awareness. 

But FarmedHere, a commercial vertical farm in Chicago, sells basil and other greens to upscale grocery chains throughout the city and suburbs. And Green Spirit Farms recently inked a deal to expand its vertical farming operation to an empty factory near Scranton, Pa.  At 300,000 square feet, it would become the largest in the nation. 

The move to grow more food indoors has also caught on for pharmaceuticals. The Defense Department funded a vertical farm in Texas that grows plants for vaccines and cancer-fighting drugs.

Still, most vertical farming operations today, even with increased efficiency due to LED lighting, have a hefty electric bill and carbon footprint.

Farms aren’t all white picket fences and red barns anymore. And in the future, they might be in skyscrapers.

SOURCE